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Phone

After moving to Emeryville I got a local phone number and installed a phone. That would be way too ordinary thing to mention if not this:

  1. The service I have is AT&T DSL line, with no phone service. It doesn't even have a dialtone.
  2. The phone itself is an old rotary phone made by Western Electric (then a part of AT&T).
  3. The phone service is Voicepulse Connect VoIP service.
  4. Asterisk PBX on my home desktop, Linksys SPA2102 dual FXS networked adapter and LPT300 pulse to tone converter (SPA2102, just like all other adapters of this kind, does not understand pulse dialing, produced by rotary phone).
So I have AT&T line, AT&T phone, but not AT&T phone service in any form.

Since SPA2102 is a dual adapter, I have another phone connected to it -- I can even call my own number from it, and it will ring on another phone because Voicepulse Connect allows four simultaneous calls. If neither phone is picked up, Asterisk forwards call to my celphone.

And yes, that's my phone number on it. My old Denver phone number works, too.

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mackys From: mackys Date: March 24th, 2008 06:55 pm (UTC) (Link)
How very retro. ;D

Can you maybe get a red phone to sit next to this one? So when there's a software emergency at work, they can call you on the red phone? ;D
raider3 From: raider3 Date: March 25th, 2008 08:53 am (UTC) (Link)
Wow, I didn't even know AT&T did "dry" DSL lines for consumers. I'd bother with it, but right now, line 2 is the only line that works in my room, since line 1 (main line in my house) is apparently dead at the wall jack. I'll need to fix that, as soon as I CAN CLEAR A PATH TO THE DAMN JACK - I really, really, REALLY need to jump start cleaning out my room. Perhaps then I can get off my ass and relocate the cordless phone extension back to my room.

Oddly enough, I use line 2 for incoming faxes, I used to have an answering machine hooked up to it, but I got tired of getting calls that were for people who had the number before me.

I like the classic phone. I remember when we had phones like that in the house. We had our phone converted to modular jacks sometime between 1979 and 1982, and shortly after that, when we didn't have to lease phone equipment from "Ma Bell" anymore, we've gone through several third-party phones. We're currently on two sets of Panasonic cordless phones (including one 2.4 GHz dual-handset) phone. I'd eventually like to go to a more recent one that allows for more than 2 handset locations. Oddly enough, it doesn't class with the Linksys 2.4 Ghz wi-fi router or repeater.

One of these days I need to call up AT&T and discontinue the optional services I don't use on line 2. It's kind of ridiculous that I'm paying $80 or more for phone service, including $35 or so for top-tier speed consumer ADSL - What did you have to do to get a "Dry" DSL line?
abelits From: abelits Date: March 25th, 2008 01:44 pm (UTC) (Link)
Wow, I didn't even know AT&T did "dry" DSL lines for consumers.

It does. Of course, it does that in its traditional retarded manner, so it taken them two weeks to get my address right, they couldn't tell if the line is installed or not and asked me to check for dialtone (that obviously wasn't there), then bounced me to line repair department that seemed to have no means to identify a dry circuit, etc. Once the line installed, it worked except for few hours outage in three months (as they explained, a router was hung, and apparently they are blissfully unaware of router monitoring). In their infinite wisdom they gave me a Motorola/Netopia DSL modem that couldn't reset the connection once the outage was over and was stuck until I returned home from work and power cycled it.

I'd bother with it, but right now, line 2 is the only line that works in my room, since line 1 (main line in my house) is apparently dead at the wall jack. I'll need to fix that, as soon as I CAN CLEAR A PATH TO THE DAMN JACK - I really, really, REALLY need to jump start cleaning out my room. Perhaps then I can get off my ass and relocate the cordless phone extension back to my room.

I would tell you that this sucks, and you should clean your room immediately, if I wasn't currently surrounded by things still waiting to be unpacked and put in place since my move-in in December.

Oddly enough, I use line 2 for incoming faxes, I used to have an answering machine hooked up to it, but I got tired of getting calls that were for people who had the number before me.

Solution: change the phone number :-)

I like the classic phone. I remember when we had phones like that in the house. We had our phone converted to modular jacks sometime between 1979 and 1982, and shortly after that, when we didn't have to lease phone equipment from "Ma Bell" anymore, we've gone through several third-party phones.

I had a similar phone when I lived in Gomel, though it was smaller and lighter.

There is however another thing... Before I got a phone I lived in an apartment building without a phone service, and had an intercom between my parents' and my grandparents' apartments. The intercom had one regular rotary phone and one touch-tone phone, of a model that I have never seen before or since.

I believe, it was originally made by Ericsson, and I can easily imagine that it was designed to be a replacement for Ericofon/Cobra -- same compact size, single-piece design. It had a regular phone keyboard, a slider and a base switch that activated when the phone was picked up. A phone had a large speaker that acted as a microphone when picked up or as a speaker if it was left on a desk, answered by moving a slider. Another, smaller microphone/speaker was on a protruding arm that acted as a handset. The whole thing looked like a high heel shoe without a heel:



Does anyone recognize this model?

We're currently on two sets of Panasonic cordless phones (including one 2.4 GHz dual-handset) phone. I'd eventually like to go to a more recent one that allows for more than 2 handset locations. Oddly enough, it doesn't class with the Linksys 2.4 Ghz wi-fi router or repeater.

2.4GHz equipment is supposed to avoid interference by spreading the signal over spectrum, either by changing frequencies, or by creating a sequence with intervals that can be used by other devices. Too bad, a lot of cordless phones and video cameras are poorly designed and create massive amount of interference. My other phone is a 2.4GHz Siemens cordless phone with two handsets (for kitchen and bedroom), and it doesn't cause any problems, either.

One of these days I need to call up AT&T and discontinue the optional services I don't use on line 2. It's kind of ridiculous that I'm paying $80 or more for phone service, including $35 or so for top-tier speed consumer ADSL

Right. People who don't cancel their ridiculously overpriced services allow those monopolists act like they own (or pwn) everybody.

What did you have to do to get a "Dry" DSL line?

There was an option on their web site to do it without asking for a phone service when ordering it for a new line.

Edited at 2008-03-25 01:58 pm (UTC)
From: nickhalfasleep Date: July 27th, 2008 04:24 pm (UTC) (Link)
Does the phone still have the "Property of Western Electric" stamp on the bottom of it? I have a mountain states one that I'd love to convert to a VoIP receiver, but I think the easiest way to do that would be to embed a full asterisk pbx inside of it so that the rotary dial clicks still function without some crazy PIC.
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Alex Belits
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Name: Alex Belits
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